Removable partial dentures: design

CDE: Removable Partial Denture Design  September 10, 2012 – 11:05 am
Hqdefault.jpg

CDE: Removable Partial Denture Design

Friday, November 8, 2013 - 9:00am

G580 -- School of Dentistry

All faculty, staff and students are invited to attend this program on Removable Partial Denture Design

By: Won-suk Oh and Berna Saglick

Removable partial dentures (RPDs) are proven to be successful in restoring partially edentulous mouths. This presentation will address physiologic and biomechanical aspects of RPD design for continuing practice of evidence-based dentistry. When restoring compromised dentition with RPD's, additional use of dental implants simplifies the situation enhancing asthetics and functions of the dentures.

Source: dent.umich.edu


You might also like:

Removable Partial Design
Removable Partial Design
Design of a Class II Removable Partial …
Design of a Class II Removable Partial …
3Shape Removable Partial Framework …
3Shape Removable Partial Framework …

We need to know

...a lot more about your situation to answer. n Specifically--which tooth is this? How many and which other lower teeth are missing? What is your periodontal health? Is the tooth to be extracted biting against upper teeth? Are the upper teeth in good shape?
There is no way to know for sure how much you'll miss the tooth if it isn't replaced. The only thing I'll say now is IN GENERAL removable partial dentures that replace teeth on just one side of a jaw (especially if there are no teeth further back) tend to be difficult to get used to from an engineering standpoint. Often even well-designed removable partials like this are more trouble than they're worth

Yes

There are many options for edentulous patients. If you are missing many or all of your teeth your options may include removable partial dentures, full dentures, single implants or implant supported prosthetics. All of these options, if made well, look very natural. However, as mentioned above, be willing to shell out some major cash...

First question is

...how did the pulps die? If from trauma from an accident and the teeth are otherwise intact, and assuming they're periodontally healthy, root canal plus internal and perhaps external bleaching may work. If the pulps are dead because of extensive decay and multiple restorations, crowns are indicated. In most offices this will still be significantly less than having the teeth extracted and implants placed. Having them extracted and a removable appliance will doubtless be less expensive, but while removable appliances (partial dentures) can look and function well, they will not function as well as restored teeth or implant-retained restorations

Removable partial denture design
Book (British Dental Association)

Related posts:

  1. Partial Denture Design
  2. Acrylic partial dentures design
  3. Removable Partial Dentures